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418 Child Abuse Reporting

In compliance with state law and to provide protection to victims of child abuse, the Board believes incidents of alleged child abuse should be reported to the proper authorities.  All of the District’s employees are encouraged, and employees who are mandatory reporters are required, to report alleged incidents of child abuse they become aware of within the scope of their professional duties.

When a mandatory reporter suspects a student is the victim of child abuse, the mandatory reporter will orally or in writing notify the Iowa Department of Human Services.  If the mandatory reporter believes the child is in immediate danger, the local law enforcement agency will also be notified.  Within forty-eight (48) hours of the oral report, the mandatory reporter will file a written report with the Iowa Department of Human Services.

Within six months of their initial employment, mandatory reporters will take a two-hour training course involving the identification and reporting of child abuse or submit evidence they have taken the course within the previous five years.  The course will be retaken at least every five years.

“Child abuse” is defined under Iowa law as:

  • Any non-accidental physical injury, or injury which is at variance with the history given of it, suffered by a child as the result of the acts or omissions of a person responsible for the care of the child.

  • Any mental injury to a child's intellectual or psychological capacity as evidenced by an observable and substantial impairment in the child's ability to function within the child's normal range of performance and behavior as the result of the acts or omissions of a person responsible for the care of the child, if the impairment is diagnosed and confirmed by a licensed physician or qualified mental health professional as defined by Iowa law.

  • The commission of a sexual offense with or to a child pursuant to Iowa law, as a result of the acts or omissions of the person responsible for the care of the child.

  • The failure on the part of a person responsible for the care of a child to provide for the adequate food, shelter, clothing or other care necessary for the child's health and welfare when financially able to do so or when offered financial or other reasonable means to do so.  A parent or guardian legitimately practicing religious beliefs who does not provide specified medical treatment for a child for that reason alone shall not be considered abusing the child.

  • The acts or omissions of a person responsible for the care of a child which allow, permit, or encourage the child to engage in acts of prostitution.

  • An illegal drug is present in a child's body as a direct and foreseeable consequence of the acts or omissions of the person responsible for the care of the child.

  • The person responsible for the care of a child has, in the presence of the child, manufactured a dangerous substance, or in the presence of the child possesses a product containing ephedrine, its salts, optical isomers, salts of optical isomers, or pseudoephedrine, its salts, optical isomers, salts of optical isomers, with the intent to use the product as a precursor or an intermediary to a dangerous substance.

  • The commission of bestiality in the presence of a minor by a person who resides in a home with a child, as a result of the acts or omissions of a person responsible for the care of the child.

  • Knowingly allowing a person custody or control of, or unsupervised access to a child or minor, after knowing the person is required to register or is on the sex offender registry.

It is not the responsibility of employees to prove that a child has been abused or neglected.  Employees should not take it upon themselves to investigate the case or contact the family of the child.  The Iowa Department of Human Services is responsible to investigate any incident of alleged abuse.

Approved:   07/13/2015    Reviewed:          Revised:  2/12/2018